"A Series of Unfortunate Events has been teaching me not to trust anybody since the year 2000"

Posted 28 May 2018 by Writing Squad in Writing Squad Reviews

Series of unfortunate eventsFrancesca Pidgeon on how the truly bad people are not who you may at first think.

A Series of Unfortunate Events has been teaching me not to trust anybody since the year 2000. Those 13 books have been with me throughout my conscious life and each time I read them I find another reason to love the densely woven fabric of the timelessly grim universe. 

In the series, three newly orphaned children called Violet, Klaus and Sunny are relentlessly pursued by a murderous distant relative and failed actor called Count Olaf, who wants to gain control of the enormous fortune their parents left behind. A bumbling Banker called Mr Poe attempts to keep them safe but refuses to believe the children when Olaf inevitably appears in a new disguise each time they are relocated. 

"The series doesn’t shy away from bitter storylines. Most people that attempt to help the children end up devoured by leeches or meeting some equally disgusting death."

The series doesn’t shy away from bitter storylines. Most people that attempt to help the children end up devoured by leeches or meeting some equally disgusting death. The books are best described as neo-Victorian. The series embraces some adult concepts and it is never assumed that something is too complex or highbrow for children to understand.

Series endUnlike the majority of children’s fiction, Snicket does his best to debunk the fairytale dichotomies. As the series goes on, the characters (‘villains’ included) are revealed to be more multifaceted than they first appear and the lines between 'good' and ‘bad’, and ‘moral’ and ‘immoral’ become increasingly blurred. They teach you to question what the ‘right' thing to do is and, when you find ‘good’ characters doing ‘bad’ things, whether or not that makes them ‘bad' people. And more than any other children’s story I've read, it makes you wonder whether there even was a ‘right’ thing to do.

"more than any other children’s story I've read, it makes you wonder whether there even was a ‘right’ thing to do"

Sometimes ‘bad’ people die. Sometimes ‘good’ people die. No-one is safe from the bad luck that befalls almost every character in the series and although the children tend to escape any harm meant to befall them, there’s no truly happy endings for anyone bar the occasional rich fat cat, (as in life). 

A Series of Unfortunate Events teaches you that institutions are often completely useless at doing the things they are designed for, that hospitals might try to perform dangerous brain surgeries on completely healthy patients, that schools might make you endlessly measure mundane objects and force you to listen to terrible violin concerts given by the headmaster. That through no fault of your own the system might fail you and you might be forced to go on the run for crimes you didn’t commit. This series deals with circumstances that are both really absurd and absurdly realistic.

"The only real evil denounced is of never questioning authority"

The only real evil denounced is of never questioning authority. The only truly irredeemable people are the ones that are sucked into a lazy mob mentality and don’t choose to look any closer at an unconvincing disguise that a child could see through.

Series endEven finding out that Lemony Snicket was in fact a pseudonym that Daniel Handler used when writing was a seminal moment in my young life. What was real? Who could I trust? Not doctors or teachers or even writers of morbid children’s fiction books apparently. 

Though this skepticism has plagued me, in many ways I am grateful that I had these books to teach me not to blindly believe what others haven't bothered to challenge.

"I am grateful that I had these books to teach me not to blindly believe what others haven't bothered to challenge."

...

A little bit about the reviewer, Francesca Pidgeon:

Francesca PidgeonFrancesca is primarily a musician and makes her living playing covers sets in bars. However, her real creative interests are sprawling and incohesive, tending to end up a part of her main creative output – her band Kumiko (see Kumiko https://kumikoknew.bandcamp.com)  Francesca writes, records, orchestrates, produces and performs the music for this project, and also creates any artwork, videos or handmade CDs that they release.

Apparently this is not enough work for Francesca, so she also writes prose and irate non-fiction (though these rarely see the light of day), she composes for film, radio and TV and is co-writing a folk opera. She will soon be heading up the Manchester contingent of ‘Girls That Gig’ which is an organisation that focuses on supporting women in music.

Her other interests include learning French at a sickeningly slow pace and playing roller derby.

Francesca and the band played as part of A Little Bite Music at the Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, 12.30 on the 4th May.

North West Libraries

Librarians in the North West have pioneered partnership working to encourage new readers into libraries. Time To Read is a partnership of librarians engaged in reader development activity in public library authorities in the North West Region. 22 public library authorities in the region currently support Time To Read.

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