Time to Read Blog

The Library of Lost and Found is the Great North West Read

Posted Thursday 24 October 2019 by Sue Lawson in Author blogs, Events, Opinion

The Great North West Read encourages everyone to read and discuss the same book during the month of November. This year, we are delighted to have the charming, page-turning and utterly brilliant The Library of Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick, to discuss.

Phaedra Patrick, author of The Library and Lost and Found

Taking inspiration from Phaedra’s own love of libraries, the story tells of volunteer librarian Martha Storm, who finds a mysterious book of fairy tales. Within its pages lies a surprising dedication that stirs up family secrets and sparks her own emotional journey of discovery.

In November, Phaedra will be visiting libraries across the North West to read from her book, sign copies, answer questions and share stories about her journey to becoming a best-selling author. Take a look at Phaedra's GNWR tour dates.

Phaedra said: “As a child, I used to visit my local library in Oldham and dream that one day my own book would sit on the shelves. The Library of Lost and Found celebrates the power of stories and I’m delighted it’s been selected as the 2019 Great North West Read.” Check the events pages for times and dates. 

The Great North West Read 2019 is also one massive, interactive book club. Help us become the North West’s largest community read - grab a copy of The Library of Lost and Found and get together to talk about the book with other readers through online and in-person book discussions.

You can get involved on social media using the hashtag #GNWR, on the Time to Read Facebook page or join two live online book club chats running on Twitter in November. Online book chats are the perfect way to keep reading, talk about what you're reading, and make friends with other readers. And you don't even have to leave your house to join in.

Twenty two library services throughout the North West, from Cumbria to Chester, including all of Greater Manchester and Merseyside are involved.

GNWR logo

The Library of Lost and Found is published by HQ/HarperCollins and will be available to borrow from all public libraries in the North West. It's also available to buy as a book, audiobook and ebook from independent bookstores, Waterstones, Amazon, Kobo, Apple, WHSmith. Get your copy and join the biggest book club in the North West! Visit Phaedra's website to discover more of her novels, read her latest news and find writing tips.

Poetry, Politics, Pop & Rock - Manchester Literature Festival

Posted Tuesday 1 October 2019 by Sue Lawson in Events

This year’s Manchester Literature Festival line-up is packed with award-winning writers, rock musicians, the new Poet Laureate and, for the first time in the city, the Booker Prize 2019 shortlist showcase where some of this year’s shortlisted authors will read and discuss their novels at this special event.

Amongst those appearing are Jeanette Winterson, Jonathan Safran Foer, Celeste Ng, David Nicholls, Mona Eltahawy, Deborah Levy, Howard Jacobson, Jackie Kay, John Lanchester, David Nott, Simon Armitage, Guy Garvey, Deborah Moggach, Jon Savage, Elif Shafak, Dave Haslam, Sarah Hall, Hanif Kureishi, Brett Anderson, Jung Chang, Caroline Criado Perez, Clementine Ford, Lemn Sissay, Henry Normal, Cathy Newman and more.

Manchester Literature Festival

Manchester Literature Festival maintains its support of original writing with its series of New Commissions, including the annual Castlefield Manchester Sermon delivered this year by Gillian Slovo, and new co-commissions in partnership with Manchester Museum and Manchester Libraries. Poet and playwright Inua Ellams (Barbershop Chronicles) responds to an artefact from Benin in Manchester Museum’s collection, and aspiring Manchester poets Hafsah Aneela Bashir and Isaiah Hull perform new work as part of the Festival’s Rewriting Longsight project with Longsight Library and #McrCreativeSpaces.

Manchester Literature Festival’s events offer more than the usual questions and answer sessions, with the Festival’s unique in-conversation pairings giving new insights and respite from a world that can often seem turbulent and bewildering. The programme considers the greatest issues of our day - climate crisis, gender equality, toxic masculinity, Islamophobia, political activism and class division - as well as exploring the diverse worlds of music, 1980s art and clubbing, and even trauma surgery in conflict zones.

Featuring over 100 established and emerging writers speaking in a broad range of events across 17 days, the Festival also includes the popular Weightmans Literary Walking Tours and plenty for younger readers in a programme that features immersive theatre show Ready Steady Lift Off! and an afternoon with David Baddiel.

Visit the festival website to book your tickets and discover even more events andhappenings across the city and beyond. Don't miss out!

Booker Shortlist announced

Posted Tuesday 3 September 2019 by Sue Lawson in Latest Libraries News

The shortlist has been announced for the 2019 £50,000 Booker Prize, which is supported by the charitable foundation Crankstart. The winner will be named on October 14. The shortlisted authors each receive £2,500 and a specially bound edition of their book. This year's shortlisted titles are:

The Testaments by Margaret Atwood
Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann
Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo
An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma
Quichotte by Salman Rushdie
10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak

The Testaments Cover of Ducks, Newburyport An Orchestra of Minorities

Quichotte 10 Minutes in 38 Seconds in this Strange World Girl, Woman, Other


Are you looking for a reading challenge. Try reading the Booker 2019 longlist. Books available to reserve or borrow from a library near you!

Margaret Atwood (Canada), The Testaments (Vintage, Chatto & Windus)
Kevin Barry (Ireland), Night Boat to Tangier (Canongate Books)
Oyinkan Braithwaite (UK/Nigeria), My Sister, The Serial Killer (Atlantic Books)
Lucy Ellmann (USA/UK), Ducks, Newburyport (Galley Beggar Press)
Bernardine Evaristo (UK), Girl, Woman, Other (Hamish Hamilton)
John Lanchester (UK), The Wall (Faber & Faber)
Deborah Levy (UK), The Man Who Saw Everything (Hamish Hamilton)
Valeria Luiselli (Mexico/Italy), Lost Children Archive (4th Estate)
Chigozie Obioma (Nigeria), An Orchestra of Minorities (Little Brown)
Max Porter (UK), Lanny (Faber & Faber)
Salman Rushdie (UK/India), Quichotte (Jonathan Cape)
Elif Shafak (UK/Turkey), 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World (Viking)
Jeanette Winterson (UK), Frankissstein (Jonathan Cape)

Awards: Booker Shortlist



Eloise Unerman reviews Dumplin' by Julie Murphy.

Posted Friday 30 August 2019 by Writing Squad in Writing Squad Reviews

Dumplin book cover


Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy is a young adult book about Willowdean Dickson, a self-proclaimed fat girl from Clover City, Texas. She’s always been at home in her own skin and her idea of having the ultimate bikini body is just putting a bikini on your body.

When new love leaves her doubting herself, she enters her local beauty pageant in an effort to take it back. The world of Dumplin’ is very important to me – both it and its sequel Puddin’ are sat on my shelves right now. I was hesitant to start reading at first. I had this fragile idea of who this girl should be and I was afraid that turning the page would ruin her. But I didn’t need to be.

I felt all the highs of Willowdean’s love life and all the lows of her relationship with her mum. But what struck me the most was something incredibly personal. She wasn’t the first plus size character I’d ever seen in a book or even the first well written one. But Murphy had perfectly pinpointed all the thoughts about being fat that I’d never spoken of, never read. And I think that’s what made Willowdean feel all the more real to me. She came along at a time when I was trying my best to have the same attitude towards my body as she did to her own. And, in an odd way, I was more than a little bit proud of her for accomplishing that.

Although Dumplin’ is a book about a girl in high school, I don’t think you need to be that age to enjoy her journey. I’d recommend this captivating book to anyone but especially those who have, at some point, felt uncomfortable in their own skin or had the sudden desire to enter a beauty pageant.

Inspired by Eloise's review? You can reserve Dumplin' from your library online for free. Or download the ebook or audiobook from your library or have a good ole Dumplin' party and watch the new film on Netflix! 

Eloise


This month's Writing Squad guest reviewer is Eloise Unerman. Eloise is based in South Yorkshire and writes poetry and short stories, plus she runs poetry workshops for adults and young people.

She was awarded the Cuckoo Young Writers Award 2017 in the Northern Writers Awards and was Young Poet in Residence at 2018’s Ledbury Poetry Festival.

She is currently Barnsley’s Poet Laureate. When not writing, you can find her learning ballet and modern dance, sketching or adding to her scarf collection.  You'll also find Eloise on Twitter @inkandamaranth


Discover The Writing Squad - creating the next generation of young writers in the north.

North West Libraries

Librarians in the North West have pioneered partnership working to encourage new readers into libraries. Time To Read is a partnership of librarians engaged in reader development activity in public library authorities in the North West Region. 22 public library authorities in the region currently support Time To Read.

Keep up to date

Follow Us

  • flickr
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • twitter

We use cookies to help us provide you with a better service, but do not track anything that can be used to personally identify you.

If you prefer us not to set these cookies, please visit our Cookie Settings page or continue browsing our site to accept them.